Videos from Future in Space Hangout

Join us as we meet with members of the American Astronomical Society and the American Astronautical Society to discuss the future of humanity's efforts in space and science.

Found 40 videos in "Future in Space Hangout" category

Using Resources in Space to Sustain Human Exploration

6th Dec, 2018 - 1k views

Is it easier to bring resources with us or use what's there when going to the moon and Mars? NASA thinks it's easier to use what's there. Learn more about NASA's thinking with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU)

LUVOIR: From Big Bang to Biosignatures - A Flagship Observatory in NASA's Future?

15th Oct, 2018 - 1.6k views

NASA will soon wrap up four concept studies of major space observatories that could launch sometime in the coming couple decades. One of these is the Large UV/optical/IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor. LUVOIR is a concept for a highly capable, multi-wavelength ob

HabEx and Living Earths: The Astronomical Answer to "Are We Alone?"

2nd Oct, 2018 - 2k views

The discovery over the past few years that stars in the Milky Way may each be orbited by at least one planet suggests that among these numerous planetary systems may reside planets similar to Earth, perhaps even harboring life. The HabEx concept is i

The Lynx Space Telescope: A Flagship Concept to Probe the Energetic Universe

18th Sep, 2018 - 1.4k views

Lynx is one of four flagship concepts for the next great space telescope. NASA has funded a series of studies of four concepts that will in less than a year's time produce candidate designs for a major space observatory to begin construction later

The James Webb Space Telescope: The Next Great Observatory

31st Aug, 2018 - 3.3k views

For more than two decades, the series of NASA Great Observatories may have revealed more about the secrets of the cosmos than had been accomplished in the preceding history of astronomical exploration. The next great history-making observatory, the J

A Gateway for Human Space Exploration: The Next Step After ISS

14th Aug, 2018 - 2.6k views

The International Space Station (ISS) has been the first successful step in long-duration human operations in space. If astronauts are to travel to Moon, Mars, and deep space, we need more technical capabilities like a deep space gateway.

How Cool is That? Observing the Low Temperature Universe with ORIGINS Space Telescope

31st Jul, 2018 - 1.5k views

What is the status of the ORIGINS Space Telescope? One of four mission concepts being considered as a followup to WFIRST.

The Future of Space Exploration Belongs to . . .Our Robot Partners?

17th Jul, 2018 - 1.3k views

No one is any longer surprised at the number of sophisticated robots in a modern factory, although many people may be surprised at how robots are becoming an attractive option for complex operations in space, including construction, servicing, and re

Nothing is Easy About Humans to Mars . . . .But What About Making it Easier?

4th Jul, 2018 - 1.9k views

Detailed scenarios for human exploration of Mars have been developed and debated for decades, although many of them have been too technically challenging or unambiguously unaffordable. However, are there scenarios that are specifically developed to b

Lost in Space? Not Sex and Gender!

18th Jun, 2018 - 2.3k views

Female and male astronauts adapt differently to space where small changes have significant impact. These issues are extremely important as we plan for exploration to the Moon and Mars as well as for commercial space travel.

Mars: We Can Get There, But How do We Land?

16th May, 2018 - 2.1k views

Surprisingly, it may be easier to get to Mars orbit one day with astronauts than it will be to actually land: safely landing on the Red Planet poses some major challenges yet to be overcome. So far, many Mars landers and rovers have used a variety o

Mars May Be Closer Than You Think: Propelling Humans to the Red Planet

1st May, 2018 - 2.3k views

Like this content? Please consider becoming a patron: https://patreon.com/DeepAstronomy Some propulsion technologies proposed to take astronauts and future generations of robotic explorers to Mars seem almost science fiction. But that’s hardly the